Lamest Contest Ever …

I just saw the lamest pitch for a crowd-sourcing contest ever: Mark Cubans’ pitch to redesign the Dallas Mavericks’ uniforms. quite obviously, it’s not THE LAMEST ever. That is courteous of your local church/synagogue/mosque etc., and is a “contest” to redesign the organizational bulletin for your mother’s friend or something.

Obviously, having designed the Dallas Mavericks uniforms would bring with it some bragging rights, and, sure, Cuban’s status as a mogul, business thinker, and Shark Tank all around smart guy, is a person whose attention may be worth having, leaning into other people’s problems for “some tickets” is comical. I like the fact that Cuban has a disregard for all sorts of rules, but seriously.

We live in a world of serious disconnect of design — on one end, we fawn over red-carpet stars who are “wearing” something you could tell me was bought at Nordstrom Rack, where, of course, they’ll pay thousands. Sure the design is unique and thoughtful, but to some extent there is some hiding and coasting and some design is flat, if not a disaster at other times. Yet on the other end, somebody’s going to sweat themselves and use IDEO-like best practices (not IDEO, of course, because who would touch this for … Tickets?) to develop a whole new vision for the Mavericks to have it buried in a contest because some staffer doesn’t like teal? … Just sayin’, it happens, for sure.

While not against contests per se, I’m against stupid ones …

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Training Wheels

I’m thinking of it as a bit of a microcosm that my son (3 and 1/2) fell off his bike because of the training wheels, as opposed to not having them. The fall was particularly hard because he was going somewhat slowly at the time.

I told him that we’re just gonna go out and learn to ride the bike. I mean the training wheels give him a sense of what riding is, not actual riding, you know?

It makes me wonder how much we limit ourselves in aspects of our lives when we have “safeguards” that allow us to do things — but prevent us from, say, getting hurt or getting in too deep — and in the end, we don’t actually experience the thing in its true nature.

Bikeconomics

I finally fixed my primary bike — which cost me a little bit, but kudos to my older bike which I’ve been riding for some time now.

I bought it at a yard sale about ten years ago now, that $25 bike (circa 1993 Specialized Epic) was high-end twenty years ago and a ride the other day gave me this revelation: “… if you ain’t in shape you can talk all you want about the newest bells and whistles, deep-dish carbon fibre rims, aero modifications, lightness and the like, but if you’re not in shape, beyond a certain point, you might as well be riding a tricycle.”

… And the return per mile on that used bike albeit about ten years old when I bought has to be astronomical: $25 and it’s put in mile after mile without complaint or problem.