Is The Prospect Of A Dope-Free Tour A Harbinger Of Things To Come?

Reading the NYT, I saw an opinion article on the slower times in the Tour De France:

“For example, the fastest riders on three of the last climbs in the Tour, including the famed Alpe d’Huez, were still three minutes slower — a lifetime in cycling — than many of the fastest riders on the same climbs during the 1990s and 2000s.”

Seeing what would be seemingly realistic results is a relief. The last number of years has been something and they aren’t over, with a case lingering in appeal over last year’s Tour. Recent admissions of by cycling legends have added to a level of relief that puts what seemed unreal in a real perspective. And I’m glad for it, without blame. I looked up a listing on Wikipedia on cycling and drugs and it stretches the length of the entire history of the sport. Why would now be any different?

The margins of success are so close — this year’s winner having missed out on a large degree of occasions — not to mention this year’s runner up Andy Schleck, having come in second three times.

Even so, the fan lauds that ostensibly (fingers crossed) what’s being done seems real … For me everything seems so unreal. But, as it turns out, so were the gifted investments of Bernie Madoff, Enron’s balance sheet, the whole tech boom, the Major League Baseball home run race and the record, and the over-heated and almost unreal housing bubble which had people buying houses in my neighborhood without getting inspections at one point out of fear that the house would be sold too quickly.

According to Wikipedia, the “Gilded Age” was a term coined at the turn of the 19th century to represent the rapid economic growth during the post-Civil War society and the term belies the superficiality that existed to the age. Would it be completely wrong to have thought of the recent timeline to be one that had its own gilding?

Also, I had a conversation with friend recently about the

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